960m2 of solar heating technology is now sitting on top of WIRAC.
960m2 of solar heating technology is now sitting on top of WIRAC. Contributed

Pool warms to solar power panels

SWIMMERS will be able to use the WIRAC pools safe in the knowledge they are not adding to a large carbon footprint.

More than 900m2 of innovative solar heating technology has now been installed across the roof span of Warwick Indoor Recreation and Aquatic Centre (WIRAC).

Southern Downs Regional Council installed the solar technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reduce the costs of heating the four pools at WIRAC.

SDRC CEO Rod Ferguson said the solar system supplements the existing gas and electric heating system.

“It is estimated that this new solar initiative will annually generate about 60 percent of the heat required to keep our pools at optimum swimming temperature,” Mr Ferguson said.

“This is a great initiative that is not only environmentally friendly but is expected to help manage energy costs.”

Installation started in May last year and was completed last month, with the final integration of automation technology to the boiler system.

The WIRAC solar hot water project is a joint initiative of Southern Downs Regional Council and the Queensland Government.

The solar heating project cost about $125,000 to complete.

Of this, $75,000 was subsidised by the Queensland Government’s Department of Infrastructure and Planning.

An SDRC spokeswoman said council had no other solar projects in line at the moment.



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