Glen McMurtrie and Allan Ruhle at the centre of APN Print’s new binding site.
Glen McMurtrie and Allan Ruhle at the centre of APN Print’s new binding site.

Print site to be state's biggest

WARWICK'S APN Print Site is about to make a big imprint on the industry, with plans for a large-scale expansion taking place.

The Kenilworth St site currently performs all stages of the printing process except the final binding of the publication pages, but that is set to change in three months when the site expands to include all stages of publication under one roof.

The ability to bind material will also mean APN Print Warwick will become the largest regional operation in Queensland.

Manager Allan Ruhle said it was an exciting time for the Warwick site.

“It means we'll probably be printing more things each week,” Mr Ruhle said.

“As well as having binding machinery, we're also putting in another press, which will give us the opportunity to take on more work.”

About 100 publications are already printed each week at the Kenilworth St site, most of which are magazines.

The print site will require another 25 or so more staff to take on the additional roles of binding and printing and Mr Ruhle said some of those positions had already been filled.

“We've brought over people from New Zealand because of their specific skills for it,” he said.

“Up to 14 people can work on the binder machine at the one time – it really is a trade in its own right.

“We'll be looking for a few more to operate that and a couple more printers and a few casuals.”

The former Queensland Beam Technology workshop on the western side of the print site will be the new area for the binding of publications.

Already some of the machinery has been moved in, but print estimator Glen McMurtrie said a lot more work would go on before it was transformed into a binding operation.

“We've had to dig out some of the concrete slabs in preparation for when we put the binding machine in,” Mr McMurtrie said.

“We'll reinforce the concrete so it's durable enough to cope with the weight of the machine.

“It also moves a lot, which means the base needs to be completely solid.”

A large number of steps are involved in large-scale printing of publications.

Once printed, the pages need to be folded in the correct order and place before they can be trimmed of any excess paper.

Until the binding operations get into swing, the publications have to be sent to Brisbane to be put together.

They are then sent to places around Australia, especially from Cairns to Sydney.



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