Freestone students at their Anzac service yesterday.
Freestone students at their Anzac service yesterday.

Young students pay tribute to the Anzacs

ALTHOUGH it was 99 years ago today, the link between young Australians of Warwick and their past stood firm as primary and high school students took time to remember the fallen.

"They were about the same as what my class when they went to war, to think about that now is unbelievable," Year 12 Scots PGC student Rylie Douglas said.

"Sometimes you feel pretty distant from what happened but mornings like these it makes you think," she said.

Scots PGC College students paid special tribute to alumni who had lost their lives to serve their country in the First World War.

Forty-two crosses commemorated the fallen, each name read out at the dawn service yesterday morning.

Acting principal Ben Manifold felt it was important for students to understand their heritage and be aware and respect the sacrifice of those who have gone before them.

"This is particularly important given the Defence Force history and traditions associated with the college," he said.

More than 400 people including local member Lawrence Springborg attended the dawn service at Scots PGC.

The mood was similar at other school services throughout the district.

Front: Rachel Alder, Hayley Carey, Alexis Haggar, William Jamieson and Dylan Ready. Back: Georges Durieux, Eddie Marshall, Kellara Harney, Olivia Brown, Hayley Schnitzerling, Riley Skerman, Alexander Dwan, Ben Guy and Warren Elder.
Front: Rachel Alder, Hayley Carey, Alexis Haggar, William Jamieson and Dylan Ready. Back: Georges Durieux, Eddie Marshall, Kellara Harney, Olivia Brown, Hayley Schnitzerling, Riley Skerman, Alexander Dwan, Ben Guy and Warren Elder.

Warwick East State School students and teachers were joined by ex servicemen Eddie Marshall and Georges Durieux as they packed into the hangar to remember those who served for their country.

"I think it's important we remember all the people who gave their lives to their country, no matter where they are from," Mr Durieux said.

"I was a doctor for France in the equivalent of the SAS and some of the things I saw were horrific.

"Throughout the ceremonies I think about what I saw."

Mr Durieux said it was good to see the school ceremonies.

"I think it's beautiful," he said.

"It keeps the memory alive and they can pass it on to their children."



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