Killarney Vet Surgery practice manager Maurice Thomson with staff members Sarah Virtue and Monique Dwan, think pushing Killarney’s main street up a few hundred meters would take the town out of the flood zone.
Killarney Vet Surgery practice manager Maurice Thomson with staff members Sarah Virtue and Monique Dwan, think pushing Killarney’s main street up a few hundred meters would take the town out of the flood zone. Georja Ryan

Push for K-town to move to high ground

THEY'VE done it for Grantham, they're considering it for Laidley, and Maurice Thomson thinks Killarney should be next on the list to be scooped up and plonked a few hundred meters away from the flood plain.

Mr Thomson, practice manager at Killarney Veterinarian Surgery, said literally lifting the town of Killarney and relocating it, would make more sense than fixing the damage caused by the floods when it would most likely happen again.

"We've had four floods in five years so what is the point in re-doing the same thing if it's going to happen again," Mr Thomson said.

Being the first place in the town to flood, he said they had tweaked the vet surgery to cope with floods as best it could.

"We built a fence to cope with the water flow and built shelves to put sensitive equipment on higher ground, but that doesn't stop the clean up and the outdoor devastation," Mr Thomson said.

"Consequently the issue causes tremendous disruption and expenses.

"So what I suggest straight out is for the council to put the screws onto the State Government and shift the bloody place."

Mr Thomson suggested the council do a land swap, or buy the businesses out, leaving them to rebuild for themselves on higher ground.

"Buy us out at market value, let us relocate and set up somewhere else - it sounds simple and why not," he said.

"We don't see the sense of pouring another $20-30,000 into this place if it's just going to go under again."

Member for Southern Downs Lawrence Springborg said while he agreed with the idea and thought it could be a plausible plan, it would have to be a community-driven decision.

"I think it should be considered, and the premier has said it's what he wants to look at, and what the insurance companies what to look at it, but we need to make sure if anything like this happens, it's about the community as a whole looking at it," Mr Springborg said.

"People are going to have different views and they all need to be discussed."

Mr Springborg said, if it were to come into fruition, it was a long-term strategy and businesses still needed to get back up and running in the meantime.

"The council, the government and the community all have a role in this and we're not going to get an answer on these things next week or even next month, but there is a time to have this discussion, and that time is now," Mr Springborg said.

Deputy Mayor Ross Bartley agreed with Mr Springborg and said it was an issue that needed a great deal of community consultation.

He also said people needed to look at the commercial side of things.

"I think there are some businesses that have got to be on highway and unless they're on the main road, they may not attract the business," Cr Bartley said.

"And it's not a matter of just picking up the road, you've got to look at the bridges too.

"But I definitely think it is worth consideration."



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