HELPING HAND: Andrew Gale is secretary of the Warwick District and Road Safety Group, a community organisation that helps residents lodge their concerns to higher powers.
HELPING HAND: Andrew Gale is secretary of the Warwick District and Road Safety Group, a community organisation that helps residents lodge their concerns to higher powers. Molly Glassey

Put your road worries into words

RESIDENTS are being urged to get up and say something if they want to see changes to their roads.

Warwick and District Road Safety Group secretary Andrew Gale said residents needed to channel their concerns into formal complaints if they wanted to see similar issues rectified.

“The problem could be as simple as needing a stop sign, or they haven’t repainted a line on the road, or a pot hole,” Mr Gale said.

“If it’s something like that, we encourage people to use the Southern Downs Regional Council app.”

Residents could take a picture of the road in question and upload it on the app however, for more dangerous intersections or highway problems, Mr Gale said residents could go through the safety group to lodge formal complaints.

“When it’s something bigger we can make a written complaint to the Department of Transport and Main Roads and get a response from them,” he said. “We’ve done a lot of stuff like that before in our 20 years.”

The ex-policeman turned driving instructor said roads took up a solid slice of Warwick residents’ concerns.

“We’re not living in a metropolitan area and that means we’re more likely to be involved in road accidents,” he said.

“And there’s a pretty large impact on the community when there is a motor vehicle accident.”

Mr Gale said the Sandy Creek Rd turn-off that claimed the life of Ivy Little and was the site other accidents, had long been on the group radar.

Earlier this year they made a formal complaint to the Department of Transport and Main Roads.

“We have included an upgrade for this intersection in our planning for future works along the Cunningham Hwy however the work is currently unfunded as it is competing with other higher network priorities,” a department spokesperson told Mr Gale.

Mr Gale said the upgrade needed to account for the inevitability of human fault.

“Our expectation is that Main Roads engineering solutions take human frailty into account,” he said

“They should allow for drivers who may not be paying attention. Let’s face it, vehicles are are operated by human beings and human beings make mistakes.”

Mr Gale said this was a reality he taught his driving students.

“As a driving instructor, I do take kids to the turn-off and say, well you’ve got to be prepared to put your foot on it and get going,” he said.

“In saying that, we think that intersection would be better served by having a designated turning lane.”

Mr Gale said he was pleased members of the public recognised these road issues and it was ultimately up to the community to create change.

“The more people that put forward their views, the more likely something will be done about it,” he said.

“If anyone wants to bring any matters to our attention, give us a call.”

Contact the group through Andrew on 0414182182.



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