Helen Ferris, who said people west of the Dividing Range are forgotten, and Rose Gimm. Photos Emma Channon
Helen Ferris, who said people west of the Dividing Range are forgotten, and Rose Gimm. Photos Emma Channon

Putting issues on the agenda

APART from a pension increase last month, members of the older generation have not been given much attention by federal politicians lately.

Some of Warwick's older residents, enjoying a game of croquet at the weekend, raised some issues of concern.

Avid croquet and bridge player Elizabeth Gray said she would like to see changes to some of the Federal Government's policies.

“All we hear about is carbon tax and the Murray Darling Basin water issues,” she said.

“What about hospitals and caring for the elderly? We still need more nurses and doctors to care for the sick.”

Mrs Gray said she was “all for” solar energy and was opposed to mining prime agricultural land.

Mrs Gray is on a single pension and said she managed to cope financially on that income.

“Everything is going to become even harder to afford, but I have private health insurance, so I can see advantages with that,” she said.

“I've had it my entire life so I don't have to worry like some others might.”

Fellow croquet player, and board games and card games enthusiast, Helen Ferrier said the government has a geographic, rather than a demographic, bias.

“They forget everyone west of the Dividing Range. It's just as though we've been alienated,” she said.

“I think it's because there aren't as many votes here as on the coast and we don't have a strong enough voice.”

Mrs Ferrier said the current pension rate was adequate and she didn't see the need to improve aged care services.

“I go to Blue Care and the facilities are fantastic there,” she said. “And we live in Regency Park which is beautiful.

“That side of it is all well catered for.”

Another local croquet player, John Thomas, disagreed however. He said more of the budget could be spent looking after the elderly.

“I'm on a full pension and I had superannuation when I retired so I get on okay,” he said.

“The pension increase in March wasn't very big though.”

Mr Thomas said he was concerned about the national debt and wanted to see the government encourage the unemployed to re-enter the workplace.

“There are far too many on unemployment benefits,” he said.

“Not only do we need them (to work) for the national good but people need to feel they're doing something worthwhile with their lives.”



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