Clem7 closure. Truck rollover on entrance ramp to the Clem 7 tunnel off Lutwyche Rd this morning. Traffic banked up along Lutwyche Rd into Brisbane.
Clem7 closure. Truck rollover on entrance ramp to the Clem 7 tunnel off Lutwyche Rd this morning. Traffic banked up along Lutwyche Rd into Brisbane.

Queensland’s deadly intersections revealed

Exclusive: Death traps on Queensland's roads have been revealed as police launch a Christmas crackdown on drug and drink-driving offences.

Data provided to News Corp by the Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR) shows the intersections where the most deaths and serious casualties occurred across three years.

It comes as Queensland Police announced Operation Romeo Sleigh to reduce serious injuries and fatal crashes over the holiday period.

TMR analysed crash statistics from January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2018 to reveal the top five intersections with the greatest frequency of serious crashes that lead to deaths and hospitalisations.

There were 11 serious crashes that resulted in 16 injuries at the Kedron Park Rd and Lutwyche Rd intersection in Kedron, just north of Brisbane.

Queensland Police have announced Operation Romeo Sleigh to reduce serious injuries and fatal crashes over the holiday period. Picture: Quinn Stuart
Queensland Police have announced Operation Romeo Sleigh to reduce serious injuries and fatal crashes over the holiday period. Picture: Quinn Stuart

Nine serious incidents were recorded at the Greenbank Rd and Mt Lindesay Hwy intersection in North Maclean, which resulted in 14 major casualties.

The Clifford St and Gold Coast Hwy intersection in Surfers Paradise notched eight serious crashes resulting in 17 serious casualties.

In Southport, eight serious crashes were recorded where Olsen Ave/Currumburra Rd meets Southport-Nerang Rd, leading to 15 serious casualties.

And at the Old Gymbie Rd and Pumicestone Rd intersection up north in Caboolture, seven serious crashes were noted that resulted in 17 serious casualties.

A TMR spokesperson said all drivers had a role to play in road safety.

"Motorists are reminded to stick to the speed limits, abide by the road rules and drive to conditions," the spokesperson said.

"All motorists need to be aware of the fatal five and take them seriously: drink and drug driving, fatigue, inattention, not using a seat belt and speeding."

Australian Road Safety Foundation Russell CEO Russell White agreed driver fatigue was an issue over the holiday period, and recommended organising a second driver on long distances to minimise the risk of falling asleep behind the wheel.

Adjusting to different environments was also an issue, he said.

"People who have been conditioned to drive in an urban environment might suddenly find themselves on a freeway or a much more open road. That can mean that people aren't looking far enough ahead, or aren't appropriately prepared for a particular stretch of road.

He also warned locals not to rely on assumptions about roads they travel frequently in the event of an increased number of holiday-makers travelling through.

Road policing command assistant commissioner Mike Keating said the "fatal five" would be the focus of Operation Romeo Sleigh, which runs until Friday, January 31.

"When you are stopped for random driver testing for drugs or alcohol, or see officers out and about over the Christmas and New Year period, know that as always, your safety is their priority," Mr Keating said.

"Whether it's mobile phone use, speeding or driving tired, do the right thing and make sure everyone gets to their destination safely."

It also comes as research from comparison site Finder.com.au showed that almost a third of respondents from a survey more than 1000 people planned to travel the country this summer.

Figures from the comparison site also highlighted the activities which distract Aussies behind the wheel.

Finder Insurance specialist Taylor Blackburn said drivers should make sure their car is roadworthy, their insurance is up-to-date and that they have roadside assistance.

The survey found 44 per cent admitted to eating food while behind the wheel, 11 per cent had sent a text message without using voice control, and 10 per cent had answered a call without using a hands-free device.

"If you're engaging in risky behaviour behind the wheel and you are in an accident, you may not be able to claim the damage on your insurance," Mr Blackburn said.

"Comprehensive car insurance also won't cover damage that's been caused by illegal activities such as texting and driving."



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