Lifestyle

'Real' books still rule

David Stuhmcke, owner of A Lot of Books in Ipswich Mall, with some of the top books people have bought this year.
David Stuhmcke, owner of A Lot of Books in Ipswich Mall, with some of the top books people have bought this year. Claudia Baxter

TRADITIONAL print books are still a favourite among book lovers, despite the emergence of new technologies and electronic books.

Hard copy books remained overwhelmingly popular, with digital books accounting for just a small percentage of sales, said Steve Cox of Dymocks.

Mr Cox said he believed printed books remained top sellers because readers enjoyed the perks that could only come from the hard copy format.

"They can flick through the pages, take the book to the beach, browse shelves and smell the pages," he said.

Research shows an overwhelming majority of customers also enjoy the experience of browsing bookstores and physically buying a book, Mr Cox said.

Author and avid reader Anna Campbell said she was a huge fan of traditional print books. The historical romance author said while her novels were published in both print and digital versions, she didn't own an eReader.

"I like the physical side of books, I like having them around the house ... I just love opening a new book, and they are relaxing to look at and read," she said.

But as more content is published digitally, Ms Campbell said she might be forced to buy an eReader.

"I think in the long run I will have to," Ms Campbell said. "But I'd be very surprised if print books go away."

While traditional books are still popular, a growing range of digital books are stocked at most book retailers as customers embrace the benefits of digital books.

Electronic books are often seen as convenient and practical, offering readers a number of advantages including:

  • Immediacy - books in digital format can be downloaded and read instantly;
  • Storage - an eReader are capable of storing thousands of books on the one device;
  • Price - digital books usually cost less than the printed version.

 

Dymocks Best sellers

1. Hunger Games, (Bk1 Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

2. Lone Wolf, by Jodi Picoult

3. Catching Fire, (Bk2 Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

4. House on Willow Street, by Cathy Kelly

5. Mockingjay, (Bk3 Hunger Games) by Suzanne Collins

6. End of the World Skulduggery Pleasant, by Derek Landy

7. Maggie's Verjuice Cookbook, by Maggie Beer

8. 11th Hour, by James Patterson

9. Religion for Atheists, by Alain de Botton

10. Australian Moment, by George Megalogenis

 

Topics:  books reading smarter shopping



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