CMO Paul Kelly is expected to announce on Sunday there is now a low risk of transmission of the B.1.1.7 COVID-19 variant in Greater Brisbane.
CMO Paul Kelly is expected to announce on Sunday there is now a low risk of transmission of the B.1.1.7 COVID-19 variant in Greater Brisbane.

Revoked: Greater Brisbane ‘no longer a hotspot’

GREATER Brisbane's status as a COVID-19 Commonwealth hotspot is expected to be revoked by Australia's Chief Medical Officer on Sunday.

States and territories slammed their borders shut to the southeast region earlier this month following the concerning UK strain cluster at the Hotel Grand Chancellor in Brisbane.

Queensland recorded no new cases of community transmission on Saturday, with Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young saying that due to "very quick work by a lot of people and the people of greater Brisbane that there is every chance we have contained this cluster … it is looking promising."

CMO Paul Kelly is expected to announce on Sunday there is now a low risk of transmission of the B.1.1.7 COVID-19 variant in Greater Brisbane.

This is in light of the first transmission event believed to have taken place on January 2 on the seventh floor of the Hotel Grand Chancellor.

If announced, there will be no Commonwealth declared hot spots across the country.

When contacted by The Sunday-Mail yesterday, Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt commended Queensland's testing and contact tracing system for its progress.

"Queensland faced a potentially highly dangerous outbreak," he said.

"But everyone involved, the Queensland Government, contact tracers, the medical community and the public deserve deep congratulations on the progress to date.

"We still need to maintain our vigilance and we will face the risk of potential outbreaks at different times and in different places around Australia, but rapid collective and co-ordinated action has shown that the systems are strong and providing protection across Australia."

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Andrew Henshaw
Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Andrew Henshaw

On Saturday, Victoria loosened its border restrictions on people travelling from Greater Brisbane, with Premier Daniel Andrews saying the region would be downgraded from a red to an orange zone.

Mr Andrews said people wanting to return home and visitors would have to apply for a permit and then would be allowed to travel freely after taking a test within 72 hours of arriving, and receiving a negative result.


As of 12.01am on Sunday, travellers from Greater Brisbane are allowed to enter South Australia without needing to quarantine.

But people will need to be tested on days one, five and 12.

New South Wales' border is open to every state and territory, while Western Australia still has a hard border closure to Queensland.

People who travel to Tasmania from Greater Brisbane after January 8 are required to quarantine.

The ACT no longer requires anyone travelling from Greater Brisbane to quarantine, and neither does the Northern Territory.

Asked yesterday whether she expected other states to reopen to Queensland, in light of no new community transmission, Dr Young said each state would make an independent assessment of what the risks were in their state and what was best for their population.

Originally published as Revoked: Greater Brisbane 'no longer a hotspot'



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