Sara Delhaas, Sarah-Anne Burton and Sarah Hawkins are raising money and awareness for the Cerebral Palsy League.
Sara Delhaas, Sarah-Anne Burton and Sarah Hawkins are raising money and awareness for the Cerebral Palsy League. Robyne Cuerel

Three daring Sarahs are being ballsy for cerebral palsy

TO JUMP from a perfectly good aeroplane takes courage - something Sarah-Anne Burton has in spades.

In five days, Sarah-Anne will abandon her wheelchair to take a tandem jump with Skydive Hervey Bay from 12,000 feet.

Sarah-Anne is 22 and has cerebral palsy, which affects the brain's control of her muscles resulting in speech, movement and posture difficulties.

"I took on the dare to jump because sky diving is the first activity on my wishlist," Sarah-Anne said via a digital communication tablet.

"I am helping support the Cerebral Palsy League because I have cerebral palsy and I know what a very important and beneficial organisation they are."

Inspired by the FebruDAREy challenge through the Cerebral Palsy League this month, Sarah-Anne plans to take on the extreme personal challenge to raise funds.

Staff and clients from the Maryborough Community Lifestyles Agency have formed a team to volunteer to raise dollars and awareness for the Cerebral Palsy League.

Sarah-Anne is flanked by two other ladies sharing her name - Sara Delhaas, 28, will swim with the sharks at Hervey Bay and Sarah Hawkins, 26, will spend the entire day in a wheelchair to fundraise for the good cause.

Featuring the slogan - Be ballsy for cerebral palsy - FebruDAREy will see hundreds of Australians face their biggest fears and carry out dares to raise awareness and much-needed money for children and adults with disabilities, a spokeswoman for the Cerebral Palsy League said.

"The Cerebral Palsy League provides vital support and services to thousands of children and adults with physical disabilities every day, at every stage of their lives."

Cerebral palsy facts

  • Every 14 hours a child is born with cerebral palsy, making it the most common childhood physical disability in Australia
  • Cerebral palsy affects the brain's control of the muscles, resulting in speech, movement and posture difficulties
  • In any year, cerebral palsy is more common than cancer, stroke, eating disorders, appendicitis and road traffic accidents
  • About 34,000 Australians, including 7000 Queenslanders, have cerebral palsy


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