A hidden camera – allegedly planted for the US – shows actress Pamela Anderson visiting WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange inside London’s Ecuadorean embassy.
A hidden camera – allegedly planted for the US – shows actress Pamela Anderson visiting WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange inside London’s Ecuadorean embassy.

Secret video of Pamela Anderson with Julian Assange

Never-before seen video footage shows WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange being examined during a doctor's visit inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London and catching up with Pamela Anderson.

The footage - allegedly obtained for the United States by a Spanish security company - will feature at a closed hearing at 10am on Friday morning (Friday, 9pm AEDT), where Assange will give evidence.

The hearing, into claims that the US spied on the Australian's embassy visits, has been closed to public reporting but a leaked UK police email shows that Assange will be called as a witness via videolink.

"As discussed on the phone this morning there is to be a videolink with the Spanish at Westminster Magistrates Court on the 20th December at 10am," the email read.

"Just confirmation of your clients willingness to appear in court as a witness."

Pamela Anderson embraces Julian Assange inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London in this secret CCTV footage. Picture: News360
Pamela Anderson embraces Julian Assange inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London in this secret CCTV footage. Picture: News360

Assange, 48, who is currently in London's maximum security Belmarsh Prison, is fighting extradition to the US on 17 spying charges and one computer hacking charge that carries a maximum 175-year sentence.

The US has accused him of dumping hundreds of thousands of documents online through his WikiLeaks site, which they say put the lives of informants at risk in Afghanistan and Iraq because their names were published.

The Spanish surveillance case, brought about by that country's National Court, will examine claims that company Undercover Global spied for several years on Assange during his time in the Ecuadorean embassy, including legally privileged discussions with his lawyers.

The company, which was responsible for security at the embassy, and its boss David Morales are being pursued for allegations of privacy breaches.

A summary document of the Spanish case claims that Undercover Global paid an embassy staffer $AU32,000 per month to spy.

Whistleblowers inside Undercover Global claimed the company was receiving more than $AU300,000 per month ($200,000 euros), with reports in translated court documents saying Morales was buying property and "high-end cars".

The Spanish court documents claim that Undercover Global was in contact with "American friends", according to whistleblowers.

Julian Assange being examined by a doctor inside the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. Picture: News 360
Julian Assange being examined by a doctor inside the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. Picture: News 360

Cameras were hidden throughout the rooms inside the Ecuadorean embassy, some of which were able to capture high quality audio and video.

A microphone was placed inside the base of a fire extinguisher, the documents claim, amid suggestions the company should also bug his bedroom.

It is alleged they also wanted to send in their undercover agents into the embassy to collect cups to obtain Assange's fingerprints and copies of his handwriting.

"Without the workers knowing the fate that would have given that information, but suspecting that it would have reached the intelligence of the United States," the translated document claimed.

Undercover Global was allegedly also tasked to spy on the head of the National Intelligence Service of Ecuador.

There was also alleged discussions about getting embassy staffers to leave a door open so Assange could be kidnapped.

"In those months in which the deepest interaction of Morales with US intelligence took place, between the beginning of 2017 and the middle of 2018 (when the UC contract ended) David Morales experienced a notable increase in assets," the documents claim.

 

"In particular, according to some of the workers, he bought a new home that would apparently have a high value.

"In addition, it also acquired some top-of-the-range cars.

"There was talk in the company that it could be charging around 200,000 euros a month for its work for the United States."

The court documents claim that Morales was working for the CIA.

"The whole range of espionage measures was carried out by the Spanish company … both moved by an alleged profit motive that would be at the base of the transfer of sensitive information obtained to US intelligence, specifically, according to Morales himself, to the CIA," the document claims.

 

Pamela Anderson arrives to visit Julian Assange at the Ecuadorean embassy in London on February 23, 2017. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire/AAP
Pamela Anderson arrives to visit Julian Assange at the Ecuadorean embassy in London on February 23, 2017. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire/AAP

It was alleged some staffers knew Assange had asylum in the embassy and why he had sought their help.

Assange's UK lawyer Gareth Peirce said in court in October that the US spying allegations would form part of his defence.

Doctors from around the world have written to the Australian Government seeking intervention into Assange's case because of claims he was in ill health.

The extradition hearing was expected to be heard in full in February.

A case management hearing was scheduled for late tonight Australian time.

A court spokeswoman said Friday's case was expected to be closed to the public and reporters.

stephen.drill@news.co.uk

Pamela Anderson has been open about her support for Julian Assange. Picture: News360
Pamela Anderson has been open about her support for Julian Assange. Picture: News360
The footage from inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London was allegedly obtained for the United States by a Spanish security company. Picture: News360
The footage from inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London was allegedly obtained for the United States by a Spanish security company. Picture: News360
The US spying allegations will form part of Assange’s defence. Picture: News 360
The US spying allegations will form part of Assange’s defence. Picture: News 360
Doctors from around the world have written to the Australian Government seeking intervention into Assange’s case. Picture: News 360
Doctors from around the world have written to the Australian Government seeking intervention into Assange’s case. Picture: News 360


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