Researchers have found that children have higher blood pressure when they have younger siblings. Brother and sister Kira and Cole Thompson said they could understand that.
Researchers have found that children have higher blood pressure when they have younger siblings. Brother and sister Kira and Cole Thompson said they could understand that. Georja Ryan

Siblings can be a real pain – scientists even say so!

TRADITIONALLY, older siblings are the sensible, conscientious perfectionists and the younger ones, the reckless social butterflies.

Going by that trend, it may come as no surprise that older children suffer higher blood pressure when they have younger siblings, scientists have found.

Cole Thompson, 12, said he wasn't surprised to hear that, having a younger sister, Kira who is eight, who is as hyperactive as they come.

"She copies me, she follows me, she goes in my room, she steals my stuff and dobs on me," Cole said.

While the pair gets along most of the time, Cole admitted Kira often drove him mad.

"I'm just cheeky," Kira said.

Having a younger brother can raise blood pressure by 3-5.9% while a younger sister on average could raise it by 3.8%.

The study showed, the older the siblings got, the effects on their blood pressure decreased.

So next time your eldest complains about their little brother or sister winding them up - perhaps show a little more understanding.



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