Chris McFerran snapped an incredible picture of a storm on Freestone Rd near the Eight Mile on Wednesday night.
Chris McFerran snapped an incredible picture of a storm on Freestone Rd near the Eight Mile on Wednesday night. Chris McFerran

Storm risk still on horizon after hail pelts down near town

HAIL so thick it looked like snow pounded properties surrounding Warwick in the first burst of the storm season.

Residents are being warned to act now as the risk of further wild weather hangs in the air for the next couple of days.

Nathan Steinberger was sitting in his home at Mount Marshall when the hail started to crash down about 6pm on Wednesday.

He said it was light at first but got bigger and bigger.

"We have not seen hail like that before, not in that volume,” he said.

Tenterfield copped a worse beating from hail in a separate storm about 3pm.

The Tenterfield Garden Shop lost $4500 worth of stock.

The risk of severe storms is still hovering over Warwick both today and tomorrow, as the weather bureau's meteorologist Harry Clark said similar weather conditions were creating further risk of severe thunderstorms.

"Warwick is on the western boundary, the areas on the edge of the range are more likely to see activity but we can't rule it out in Warwick itself,” Mr Clark said.

The storms were unlikely to bring heavy rainfall, he said.

Wednesday's storm dropped 16mm of rain at Goomburra, but only 2mm at Glengallan Creek and no rain in Warwick.

WILD WEATHER: Hail collects on the ground after a storm at Mount Marshall.
WILD WEATHER: Hail collects on the ground after a storm at Mount Marshall. Nathan Steinberger

"Given it's fairly early spring, generally we don't have the moisture we need to see heavy falls,” Mr Clark said.

"The large hail and damaging winds are what's making the storms severe.”

Despite the wild weather, the Warwick State Emergency Service did not receive any call-outs.

Local controller John Newley said the storm season was expected to be drier than usual, but not necessarily be worse than previous years.

"We can get dry storms, which is really bad for the rural fire people, where we get lightening strikes and it starts bushfires,” Mr Newley said.

Mr Newley said now was the time for people to prepare by clearing gutters, removing overhanging trees and organising a storm emergency kit.

How to prepare for storm season

STORM season has officially begun so now is the time to prepare the home for emergencies.

Here are four things to do now to become more storm resilient:

1. General maintenance

Check the roof for loose tiles, clear gutters and downpipes, trim trees and overhanging branches, and secure loose items that could cause damage in high winds.

2. Prepare for the worst

Identify which room is the strongest in the house, this will be the smallest room with the least windows. Find out how to turn off mains supply for water, power and gas. Ensure your home, contents and car insurance is current and covers assets adequately.

3. Link to services

Keep an eye on the BoM website for weather warnings.

4. Make a kit

Put together an emergency kit with a torch, spare batteries, water and first aid essentials.



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