Broadwater State School students and Terry Byrnes from Buy a Bale are thanking everyone for their support.
Broadwater State School students and Terry Byrnes from Buy a Bale are thanking everyone for their support. Amy Kadel

Students baling out farmers in need

BROADWATER State School have shown regional farmers a helping hand, by raising money in collaboration with Buy a Bale.

On May 13, primary students from schools around the Granite Belt participated in “dress like a farmer day” with students bringing in a donation.

The money from the day was donated Buy a Bale, an organisation that helps farmers by donating bales of hay to them.

Terry Byrnes, from Buy a Bale, and said the day was a great success.

“We haven’t counted everything but we’re up around $2870, which is pretty good,” he said.

“Ray Taylor, from Taylor’s farms, they donated 500 litres of diesel, which is equal to $550, so it’s not a bad count.”

Most of the donations came from the schools that participated.

“Twelve schools in our area, small schools only, on Friday the 13th all these kids came to school dressed as farmers and they bought in a donation and that’s were it started and that’s were it finished,” Terry said.

“We had outside donations, which totalled up to $857.

“So the kids raised their $2000.

“It was just magic, we didn’t hit any big business, we didn’t know where this was going.”

Buy a Bale are also receiving support from other businesses including Poole’s Produce, and Granite Belt Freighters who have donated the use of a truck to transport the bales.

The donations were put to use straight away with hay already delivered.

“It’s only something you can explain when you look into their eyes, when you’re out there because it’s just magic, it just blows you away,” Terry said.

“I asked them deadset does this help or does it just prolong the pain and they said ‘Don’t worry, it helps’.”

Principal of Broadwater State School, Shannon Armbruster was responsible for the dress up day and said the schools are considering holding it again.

“It was a magic idea and Shannon’s come up with the idea of doing it once a term,” Mr Byrnes said.

“The other schools are happy to revisit the idea and do something again,” Shannon said.

Terry commented that one of the best parts, other than helping the farmers, was seeing the kids get involved.

“These kids, they just get so excited and it’s just magic where a couple of dollars here and a couple of dollars there go so far,” he said.

The students are now also preparing packages for the kids to help distract them from what is happening.

“We’re looking at sending out stationery stuff and colouring-in stuff, things for them to do that are colourful because their environment is just so dead and they need to have a bit of kid life,” Shannon said.

For more information about the crisis facing regional farmers or to donate, visit www.buyabale.com.au.

Stanthorpe Border Post


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