Warwick Christian College students will check out the Transit of Venus through their new SolarScope.
Warwick Christian College students will check out the Transit of Venus through their new SolarScope. Tara Wyllie

Students search for the stars

BETWEEN 8:30am and 2:30pm today, Warwick will host one of the best spots to view a solar phenomenon - and Warwick Christian College has just the right equipment to do so.

Not due to occur for another 106 years, the Transit of Venus is a once in a lifetime spectacle where Venus passes directly in front of the sun.

Warwick Christian College won a SolarScope just in time to view the event and teacher Margie Woods said the students had a keen interest in the history of the Transit of Venus.

"Captain Cook was looking for a good spot to see Venus so he went to Tahiti. Then he came to Australia and found a better spot," Year 4 student Phoenix Eaton said.

"Venus is going to be very bright so you shouldn't look at the sun. Only if you have a pinhole projector or a SolarScope," said student, Joy DeCourcy.

"It's going to be really cool and the first and last time we will see it," said Year 4 student, Kimberley Hutley.

Warning: Never look directly at the sun with the naked eye. Go to fairtrading.qld.gov.au/safe-viewing-of-astronomical-events.htm for how to view the Transit of Venus safely.



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