Warwick Christian College has been accepted into the state’s Literacy and Numeracy Coaching Academy, which is a program that will start next year led by Rachel Leslie.
Warwick Christian College has been accepted into the state’s Literacy and Numeracy Coaching Academy, which is a program that will start next year led by Rachel Leslie. Katie Cameron

Students set to benefit from coaching academy

WITH only 100 schools in the state chosen, Warwick Christian College is celebrating after being handpicked for the Queensland Literacy and Numeracy Coaching Academy, a program that will start at the school next year.

Warwick Christian College learning enrichment co-ordinator Rachel Leslie has been selected to be the coach of the program, which will help teachers at the school become the best they can be.

"The funding gives training and professional development opportunities for the teaching team," Mrs Leslie said.

"We are focusing on writing, helping to improve student results in NAPLAN and deliver consistency in teaching practice."

Mrs Leslie will spend one day a week concentrating on ways to support teachers to develop their skills, whether it is typing up templates for assessment or researching and demonstrating new teaching methods.

"We will ensure that the curriculum is suited to every child," she said.

"The academy is very much based on the latest research, using data collection from schools."

The program is based on the Art and Science of Teaching, a book by Robert Marzano.

"The idea is to get the best outcome for schools through up-skilling all teachers," Mrs Leslie said.

"The planning has already begun here, but everything will start in earnest from day one next year."

Because Mrs Leslie is selected as a coach, she will have access to advice from the highest-level educators in Queensland, and will pass that information to teachers at the college.

Warwick Christian College principal Terrence McCorkell said the initiative would bring lasting change to the school.

"Here is an opportunity to make a difference," he said.

"I think it is terrific.

"It is a testament to the determination of staff to see better outcomes for kids.

"You don't just do it and stop when the money runs out.

"You commence a new way of doing things and a new way of teaching and learning.

"When the funding is finished, you can continue on with that.

"There will be a new pattern of doing things that stay with the school beyond the life of the grant."

Mr McCorkell said it was about cementing change in the way people work.

"There is a wealth of knowledge that builds up in schools which are part of the project," he said.

"It's a sense of collective wisdom in the areas of literacy and numeracy teaching."



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