SURVEY SHOWS: Smoking rates among Queensland secondary school students have dropped significantly in last year.
SURVEY SHOWS: Smoking rates among Queensland secondary school students have dropped significantly in last year. Matthew Deans

Queensland secondary school students stub out smoking

THE number of Queensland secondary school students smoking has dropped significantly in the last 123 months, according to new survey results.

Results from the Australian Secondary Students' Alcohol and Drug (ASSAD) survey showed the number of students who had smoked a cigarette in the previous 12 months more than halved, from 32 per cent in 2002, to 15 per cent in 2014.

The proportion of Queensland students surveyed who indicated they had smoked during the previous week fell from 14% in 2002 to just 6% in 2014.

Cancer Council Queensland spokeswoman Katie Clift said the trend among young Queenslanders was extremely encouraging.

"The Queensland Government's commitment to tobacco control over the last decade has helped young people quit smoking, preventing our next generation from taking up this lethal habit," Ms Clift said.

"There are a range of tobacco control measures that have contributed to the decline in smoking rates among secondary school students in Queensland.

"Smoke-free spaces, quit campaigns, plain packaging, and price increases have all played a part in reducing smoking rates across the state."

"It's important for teenagers to understand the dangers of smoking, and that even occasional or social smoking is harmful to their health," she said.

Around 3700 Queenslanders die from a tobacco-related disease each year with 10% caused by second-hand smoke exposure.

Smokers are urged to phone the Quitline on 13 78 48 for help.



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