Warwick Hospital midwives Linda Coombes and Dayle Osborn learnt some new skills at the breastfeeding workshop yesterday.
Warwick Hospital midwives Linda Coombes and Dayle Osborn learnt some new skills at the breastfeeding workshop yesterday.

TAFE hosts breastfeeding seminar

JUST how important is “naked body contact” between a mother and her baby during the first hour after birth?

When does nipple distortion lead to nipple tortion and just how do you get a baby to latch on when he or she just isn’t interested?

These topics and more were covered at a breastfeeding seminar held at the Warwick TAFE yesterday, with 32 eager nurses and midwives practising techniques on dolls provided.

For Warwick Hospital midwives Linda Coombes and Dayle Osborn, the seminar was invaluable in their important role in helping mothers.

“Breastfeeding is the natural way of bringing up children but many mums face difficulties as it’s either the first time they’re doing it or they don’t know what to do,” Mrs Coombes said.

“It’s our job to help them get over that first hurdle and the seminar has really helped us.”

Mrs Osborn said the 32 nurses and midwives from Warwick, Goondiwindi, Stanthorpe, Toowoomba and Oakey were “very fortunate” to have three highly-skilled guest speakers.

“The information is practical and relevant for dealing with any problems we face,” she said.

The speakers included Margaret Wendt from the office of Queensland Health Chief Nurse, Brisbane lactation consultant Bridget Ingle and midwife and nurse Ruth Cantrill from Griffith University Research centre who all spoke on different topics surrounding breastfeeding.

“I’ve been speaking about things that affect the confidence of the mothers and the ability of the baby to latch on and feed well,” Mrs Cantrill said.

The seminar was delivered through the Warwick Health Service and nursing unit manager Graeme Eldridge who facilitated yesterday’s session.

“We have run similar sessions through the health service but this is the first time we’ve had speakers from Brisbane which attracted nurses from other towns to develop a better understanding of breastfeeding,” Mr Eldridge said.



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