A BUMPER YEAR: with more volunteers than ever Days For Girls has helped women all around the world by making sustainable sanitary kits right from their own homes.
A BUMPER YEAR: with more volunteers than ever Days For Girls has helped women all around the world by making sustainable sanitary kits right from their own homes. Sophie Lester

The charity that went above and beyond

CHARITY organisation Days For Girls has helped more girls from developing countries than they would have dreamed of at the beginning of this year.

The group started with a goal of producing 1000 sanitary kits for women and girls in developing countries around the South Pacific region, but they've gone above and beyond.

As 2017 draws to a close, the group has made and posted 1200 kits, which include hand-sewn sanitary bags, shields and liners.

Team leader Rosemary Easton says poor access to sanitary products is a major problem for menstruating women from developing countries such as India, Vanuatu ,the Philippines, Sudan, Laos and Nepal.

Ms Easton said it was one of the major barriers to education, resulting in many women missing school and work each year.

"[Women] have been given the chance to continue their education, feel valued and walk tall this year,” Ms Easton said.

"This has become a reality due to the wonderful spirit of generosity in our community.”

With over 60 members from across the Darling Downs, Days For Girls has produced a total of 3000 sanitary kits since it was established in 2015.

Ms Easton said the charity has a positive impact on its volunteers as well.

"What we're doing is good for the girls oversees, but also for the community here,” she said.

"Someone said to me the other day that they sit around at home, and it's nice knowing that they can do something to help someone in the world.”

Aside from making the sanitary kits, the group has held a number of fund-raising drives throughout the year.

Tomorrow they will get a little extra support, when Southern Downs Mayor Tracy Dobie presents the group with a donation from the Southern Downs Regional Council.

"Every Friday the council staff wear casual clothes and bring a gold coin donation that goes to a charity at the end of the month,” said Cr Dobie.

The donation amount is yet to be revealed, but Ms Easton said the group will be grateful for whatever they receive.

.



REVEALED: Members step up with new vision for Warwick RSL

premium_icon REVEALED: Members step up with new vision for Warwick RSL

Report exposes management issues, theft, food poisoning and tax debt

Police hunt thieves who stole three cars from Warwick

premium_icon Police hunt thieves who stole three cars from Warwick

It's believed they dumped a stolen Mercedes beforehand

HEALTH WARNING: Wastewater contaminates Condamine River

HEALTH WARNING: Wastewater contaminates Condamine River

Residents told to steer clear of Condamine River after overflow.

Local Partners