The scary questions we have to ask

 

I HAVE never had such a dirty weekend in my life.

I'm talking about indulging in some absolutely filthy, disgusting and depraved acts - and I did them all in front of my children.

In fact, I made them join in. It was a family foursome that was truly nasty … and has possibly stained the Moore name forever.

Get your minds out of the gutter … although that was literally where our bodies were.

Under the duress of whingeing children, I recently agreed to participate in the Raw Challenge in Numinbah.

It combined three of the things I hate most in this world: exercise, mud and active wear. But I immersed myself in all of the above for the love of my kids.

 

Queensland Police released Polair vision of the Lower Beechmont bushfire, captured between 11.45pm Friday and 4am Saturday.
Queensland Police released Polair vision of the Lower Beechmont bushfire, captured between 11.45pm Friday and 4am Saturday.

ANN WASON MOORE: MARGARET COURT SHOULD NOT BE BANISHED FOR HER VIEWS, NO MATTER HOW OFFENSIVE WE FIND THEM

Let me be clear: I don't even like sand. I refuse to sit beside the seaside unless there is at least one towel to barricade between the beach and my butt.

Meanwhile, any desire I've ever had to exercise has long been exorcised.

But this challenge, which saw our family traverse four kilometres of Hinterland trails, was far more mental than physical.

The obstacles included fully immersing my body in the thickest, stinkiest, nastiest mud soup you can imagine - like swimming in a Tangalooma Island toilet bowl post-gastro plague.

One challenge involved sliding down a narrow industrial rubber tube into a putrid mud pond. It was only upon splashing into the stagnant water that I spotted hundreds of tadpoles swarming to the surface. And, of course, it was later determined that these were in fact cane toad tadpoles.

I'm still living in fear that I've accidentally ingested one of those squirmy monsters and that I'll soon birth my own swamp baby.

 

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Gold Coast school students at a climate change protest outside the Varsity Lakes office of Minister Karen Andrews. Picture: Bond Newsroom
Gold Coast school students at a climate change protest outside the Varsity Lakes office of Minister Karen Andrews. Picture: Bond Newsroom

ANN WASON MOORE: PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY THE BIGGEST PROBLEM ON THE GOLD COAST

 

Physically, I know this is probably impossible. But mentally, well, it seems all too likely.

Yet that was the joy of this challenge - putting both my body and my sanity on the line.

Along with seeing the smiles of delight from my children and their friends - all of whom were literally as happy as pigs in mud - it sparked a fierce pride within myself, as well.

I was scared, I didn't want to do it - but I did it. And I had fun.

Most importantly, it reminded me of the value of moving out of our comfort zone.

Yes, challenges and changes can be scary and confronting, but they also stimulate growth.

And it's a lesson we need to learn not just as individuals, but also as a city - and especially as a country.

As devastating fires sweep across the eastern seaboard, fingers are pointing to climate change as the culprit.

Glen Innes Severn Council Mayor, Carol Sparks, who lost her home, said: "There is no doubt about it, we are suffering from the effects of climate change and global warming.

"The trees are dying and they are so dry and volatile," Ms Sparks said.

 

 

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is seen inspecting burnt out property during a visit to the bushfire affected area of Binna Burra in the Gold Coast Hinterland, Friday, September 13, 2019. (AAP Image/Dave Hunt)
Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is seen inspecting burnt out property during a visit to the bushfire affected area of Binna Burra in the Gold Coast Hinterland, Friday, September 13, 2019. (AAP Image/Dave Hunt)

ANN WASON MOORE: CIGARETTES A DISTRACTION ON GOLD COAST ROADS

"We've got no water in our dams, no water in our rivers, no water in our creeks."

Many would disagree, and argue that climate change is not an "inconvenient truth" but a convenient excuse.

But is that even important? Reducing pollution and encouraging sustainable practices may not save the world - but it sure as hell isn't going to hurt it.

The true fact of the matter is that we need to move beyond our comfort zone of minimal environmental action … and challenge ourselves to change.

Yet when questioned directly about climate change over the weekend, Prime Minister Scott Morrison answered: "My only thoughts of the day are with those who have lost their lives and their families, firefighters who are fighting the fires, the response effort that has to be delivered and how the Commonwealth has to respond and support those efforts."

Fair enough, but that answer has an expiration date.

It's disturbing that even talking about climate change makes us uncomfortable, let alone taking any action.

Yes, change is scary - and I understand concerns about the unknown effects on the economy and employment - but change can also stimulate growth.

We need to challenge ourselves to get our hands dirty because the issue of climate change is Australia's own raw challenge.

If we jump in, we might just surprise ourselves.



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