GOOD CITIZEN: Max Goodwin, pictured earlier this year as he celebrated his 80th anniversary playing the pipes in Anzac Day service.
GOOD CITIZEN: Max Goodwin, pictured earlier this year as he celebrated his 80th anniversary playing the pipes in Anzac Day service.

Tributes pour in for Warwick legend Max Goodwin

MUCH like how he treated his prized garden, Max Goodwin will be best remembered for nurturing the lives of those in our Rose City.

Warwick is mourning the loss of the transport industry legend after he passed away last Wednesday, aged 88.

Max was best known as operator and owner of Goodwin’s Charter Coaches, a family-owned business he grew on a ethos of dedication.

According to daughter Teena, a day wouldn’t go by without Max getting caught up in a conversation with someone down the street or on his bus.

“I think he was genuinely interested in people,” she said.

“He always saw the best and had a kind word for everybody.”

Teena said her father was an extremely hardworking man.

“He worked seven days week and would sit up at night at the kitchen table, taking calls and ringing people back about quotes, doing the banking,” she said.

“He did it all manually, he never had a computer in the business and rarely had a calculator but he had the neatest handwriting and would add everything up almost perfectly every time.”

A photo of Max Goodwin from 1995.
A photo of Max Goodwin from 1995.

Longtime friend Doug Cutmore said Max’s generosity of spirit was something he could attest to.

“He was one of those lovely people, and there’s no other words to describe him. He was a friend to all and a damn good citizen,’ Mr Cutmore said.

“When he worked in the fruit shop, he gave a lot of fruit to people who couldn’t afford it. He had a heart for people in need.

“I’m all the richer for knowing him and a lot of others are in the same boat.”

Getting ready to march in 1985, Stuart Symonds, Jack Harrison, Max Goodwin, Jenny May, Ivan Gillespie, Grant Craike, Merve Wickham, Doug Cutmore, Bruce Gillespie and John Madson.
Getting ready to march in 1985, Stuart Symonds, Jack Harrison, Max Goodwin, Jenny May, Ivan Gillespie, Grant Craike, Merve Wickham, Doug Cutmore, Bruce Gillespie and John Madson.

At his funeral this Friday, the beloved community figure will also be farewelled by one of his dearest pastimes — the Warwick Thistle Pipe Band.

The avid piper who began at aged eight, Max used to play for the soldiers going off to WWII.

“Whenever they would get a caning at school, the teacher would let him off saying, ‘we need to look after those fingers’,” Teena said.

“It was a very special thing to him.”

Warwick Thistle Pipe Band vice-president Alexander Manfield said he had been inundated by community members sending their love to the band.

“He was widely known, respected and loved throughout the community,” Mr Manfield said.

“It is always sad to lose longstanding community members like him.”

Max is survived by children David, Charon and Teena, seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

His funeral will be held on Friday and the family plan to livestream the even due to coronavirus restrictions.



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