A saddened Supreme Court judge accepted Clayton George Bull was genuinely remorseful after making a puzzling decision to sell drugs.
A saddened Supreme Court judge accepted Clayton George Bull was genuinely remorseful after making a puzzling decision to sell drugs. Patrick Woods

Former surf life saver 'seduced' by drugs

FOR decades, Clayton George Bull led a selfless, law-abiding life.

In the words of a judge, Bull was the "ultimate family man".

But Justice Martin Burns said when Bull made a baffling choice to sell drugs, the altruistic community helper became someone complicit in that community's suffering.

"It is a terrible thing to find yourself in this position," Justice Burns told the Sunshine Coast businessman in Brisbane Supreme Court.

Bull, 58, had no prior criminal history but pleaded guilty on Monday to trafficking ice and supplying cocaine.

The court heard Bull tried ice after facing financial and health troubles.

Defence counsel Tony Kimmins did not dispute money was a motive in the trafficking.

He said Bull probably felt "buoyancy" from trying the new drug, but was soon "seduced into the lifestyle" and a "completely separate life".

The supreme court judge repeatedly voiced shock at how Bull went from self-medicating to trafficking.

Bull sold ice 54 times to at least five regular customers.

The grandfather was caught after police used phone intercepts. He admitted to trafficking from early 2015 to mid-2016.

"It's terribly sad ... but I just don't understand why," Justice Burns added.

"He really is, apart from this conduct, the ultimate family man. When he wasn't working, he was giving back to the community, and in substantial ways."

Bull tragically lost his son in an accident last year.

Kurt Bull, 32, and Daniel King, 41, died in August at Queensland Raceway when their Holden Monaro crashed into a wall after crossing the finish line.

Justice Burns accepted Bull had taken good care of his son's family, was deeply remorseful for trafficking, and led a previously "blameless" life.

But he said the meth trade caused substantial suffering to people.

"They will have their own story, perhaps not dissimilar to yours."

The judge said Bull had a low or "almost non-existent" reoffending risk.

Justice Burns said many "good people" spoke on Bull's behalf but there was no way the court could not send him to jail.

He was jailed for five years but the sentence will be suspended after 12 months. -NewsRegional 



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