ON THE MARKET: Sirromet Wine’s St Jude’s vineyard has hit the market, but the company is committed to staying in the Granite Belt. (Photographer Alice Mabin)
ON THE MARKET: Sirromet Wine’s St Jude’s vineyard has hit the market, but the company is committed to staying in the Granite Belt. (Photographer Alice Mabin)

Vineyard’s sale secures climate friendly future

RUMOURS a prominent Granite Belt winery is leaving the region have been quashed, despite one vineyard currently listed for sale.

Sirromet Wine’s St Jude’s Ballandean vineyard hit the market, raising questions about the winery’s future in the region.

General manager Rod Hill said the sale of the 32.9ha vineyard would ensure the longevity of the business’ two other vineyards.

“We’re investing in the vineyards that we’re retaining and adapting them to suit the wine market and the changes that are coming into effect due to climate change,” Mr Hill said.

“We’ve been through a very challenging time with fire and drought – it’s common knowledge that the Granite Belt had a difficult vintage last year.”

The winery reported a 90 per cent decrease in their yield on the normal vintage this year.

Chief winemaker Mike Hayes at Sirromet is focused finding varietals suited for the Granite Belt’s climate. (Pic Peter Wallis)
Chief winemaker Mike Hayes at Sirromet is focused finding varietals suited for the Granite Belt’s climate. (Pic Peter Wallis)

Mr Hill said the sale of St Jude’s would allow Australia’s leading winemaker, Mike Hayes, to cultivate a higher-quality product.

“We’re focused on getting ahead of the curve and making those changes,” he said.

“As much as it’s been challenging (through drought), it’s been positive because it’s fast-tracked a lot of our thinking and things we were going to do over many years.”

The emergence of non-traditional wines has been well received by the winery’s consumers, according to Mr Hill.

“We’ve seen there is a strong desire from our customers and other consumers to be open to change,” he said.

“The traditional varietals, like your shiraz, will always have a place and we’re not walking away from those.

“We’re confident in making the investment we need to make to start planting some of these new varietals … We’re planting varietals that are drought resilient and future proofing our business.”

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