Condamine Sports Club president Ross Bell with the Volunteer of the Year nominees.
Condamine Sports Club president Ross Bell with the Volunteer of the Year nominees. Michael Cormack

Winning award means a lot to volunteer Darryl Gillam

FOR hockey volunteer Darryl Gillam, the sport has been his life.

Having played hockey since he was in school, he has also volunteered at the club since he returned to Warwick in 1975.

It was only fitting then, that Mr Gillam was presented with the inaugural Gerard Walsh Perpetual Trophy at the Warwick Daily News/Warwick Credit Union Junior Sports Star dinner on Monday night, an award for the most outstanding Condamine Sports Club Volunteer of the Year.

Mr Gillam said it meant a lot to win the award, going up against five other hard working volunteers.

"I'm really stoked, I was hoping to win it," Mr Gillam said.

"This is the culmination of a lot of hard work.

"There were a lot of other worthy winners but unfortunately the judges can only pick one."

Mr Gillam said he the best part of being a volunteer was the interaction.

"One of the best things about volunteering would have to be the camaraderie between all the volunteers," he said.

"It's a team effort and we always get along well."

Mr Gillam took over the presidency of the Warwick Hockey Association in 1976 and said the state titles were one of his fondest memories.

"I moved back to Warwick in 1975 and then we had the biggest flood ever in 1976," Mr Gillam said.

"We held the state senior and colts hockey titles in 1979, which was a massive event for the club."

Mr Gillam said rebuilding from the floods had been the toughest thing as a volunteer.

"The worst thing was probably rebuilding from the floods," Mr Gillam said.

"Council helped us rebuild the mounds, and I think that was one of the government stipulations to get the grant (the $481,000 grant received after the floods), we had to have the mounds.

"Doc Bodimeade was one of the instigators of putting down three new lots of turf after the floods so he's always been a big help too.

"We definitely don't need any more floods again."

Mr Gillam said he had totalled up his volunteer hours and not surprisingly, it was a huge amount.

"I always keep a total of how many hours I've done in a book," he said.

"Last year I did over 300 hours of work.

"This year I went away in January but since I came back I've done 106 hours."

Mr Gillam said hockey was ingrained in him.

"It's been a huge part of my life," Mr Gillam said.

"I played until I was 52, it's in my blood - I would still be playing now but my legs won't carry me anymore.

"But I always enjoy coming down to help out when I get a bit of spare time.

"I've always mowed the grass and done odd jobs around the clubhouse."



50 years of real service: Pat Brosnan calls time from Co-op

50 years of real service: Pat Brosnan calls time from Co-op

His last week was in stark contrast to his first week back in 1968.

No insecticides part of winery's push for sustainability

No insecticides part of winery's push for sustainability

GRANITE Belt's unique bushland inspires environmental mission

There's much more to two-up than you think

There's much more to two-up than you think

More than a coin flip, the game speaks volumes about Aussie identity

Local Partners