THE droplets of rain that tickled the cheeks of Louise Tait and Robyn Marsh when they looked their "drought dragon" in the eye was the peak in a string of serendipitous moments that led to his creation.

Seeing their magical monster for the first time in full daylight, the creative pair could see the dragon was doing his job.

Bright, bold and brimming with symbolism, the Drought Dragon was inspired by a tale in Chinese mythology.

According to legend, the Chinese dragon was late to a parade at the Jade Palace because he stopped to bring water to a small village ravaged by drought.

"It wasn't what we planned originally but we came across the idea in our research and thought it was appropriate for what we are all feeling at the moment," Mrs Tait said.

 

MAGIC MOMENT: Robyn Marsh and Louise Tait peet from the plastic beard of their
MAGIC MOMENT: Robyn Marsh and Louise Tait peet from the plastic beard of their "Dragon of Drought" on Palmerin St. Marian Faa

"Dragons are resilient and courageous, just like our farmers, but also need respect and compassion in tough times."

Wrapped around the fifth tree on Palmerin St, the dragon is the fifth sign in the Chinese Zodiac. But you don't have to be an expert in Chinese mythology to appreciate the significance of the dragon's message to Warwick.

"Like everyone, we just wish it would rain because the drought really does have a huge flow-on effect," Mrs Marsh said.

In a time where the dry conditions have stripped colours from our fields and trees, the dragon brings back life into our streets and sends a positive message of solidarity and support.

 

MAGIC MOMENT: Sisters Ivy Adhara  and Asha Mae Philipson playing with the beautiful drought dragon created by Louise Tait and Robyn Marsh on Palmerin St .
MAGIC MOMENT: Sisters Ivy Adhara and Asha Mae Philipson playing with the beautiful drought dragon created by Louise Tait and Robyn Marsh on Palmerin St . Marian Faa

"This festival brings people out of the city so they can actually see what it looks like out here," Mrs Marsh said.

"I think they don't realise what it actually looks like until they see a paddock all dried up and they are shocked."

But as people pass by the display and strike up conversations, Mrs Tait and Mrs Marsh are relieved to see their message getting through.



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