POWER ON: 21-year-old Warwick powerlifter Tom Hardy trained tirelessly in the lead up to breaking the world record.
POWER ON: 21-year-old Warwick powerlifter Tom Hardy trained tirelessly in the lead up to breaking the world record. Marian Faa

WEIGH TO GO: Warwick powerlifter smashes world record

BREAKING a world record isn't something most 21-year-olds can lay claim to, but Tom Hardy has done it twice.

Bringing his second world record "home to Warwick” was a moment of pride for the homegrown strongman, became the first person to squat 333 kilograms in the junior 110kg division powerlifting competition on October 20.

He was also crowned overall winner for his division, hoisting a combined total of 782.5 kilograms across three different lifts at the GPC Junior National Powerlifting competition in Perth.

"Brutal” training regimes, impeccable technique and an unfaltering drive to be the best were qualities that took Warwick's young achiever to international fame.

"I worked tirelessly in training for almost six months in the lead up,” Mr Hardy said.

Powerlifting is a strength sport that combines three challenging lifts: a squat, benchpress and a deadlift.

Mr Hardy got into the sport when he was sixteen, after landing a traineeship at WIRAC.

Tom Hardy trains and manages DY Gym on Grafton St in Warwick.
Tom Hardy trains and manages DY Gym on Grafton St in Warwick. Marian Faa

Four years on, with one world record already under his belt, it was a last-minute decision to jump up a weight class that earnt him his second world record.

"A couple of weeks out I just decided to have a crack at the 110kg class and it paid off,” he said.

"It was always my goal to bring one world record home to Warwick but now to have two is really humbling and hopefully in the future I can bring more,” he said.

Mr Hardy said the support from people in Warwick was "humbling”.

"My family has been amazing, but even people who I don't have that much contact with always take the time to approach me and offer their support, which is really lovely because Warwick is my home town,” he said.

Now gaining recognition among the top young powerlifters in the world, Mr Hardy was yesterday invited to compete in the Pro Raw Powerlifting competition at the 2019 Arnold Classic, which is Australia's largest fitness expo.

Tom Hardy is keen to take things slow, despite being invited to compete in the Pro Raw open category.
Tom Hardy is keen to take things slow, despite being invited to compete in the Pro Raw open category. Marian Faa

He said it was an honour to be asked to pump iron in the world's third biggest for powerlifting competition.

But a long-view to success saw the humble strongman turn down the opportunity.

"You're up against giants in that competition and I just felt I was not ready for that,” he said.

"I just want to keep doing what I am doing and keep breaking more world records in the juniors category and then step up and hunt the opens down when I am old enough.

"I want to take care of my body ... being so young I don't want to push myself and break early, I just want to take my time and wait until I am ready.”



Toolkit gives confidence in future of play

premium_icon Toolkit gives confidence in future of play

The return of sports in Warwick is looking more promising, with clear guidelines...

School’s Anzac service goes virtual

premium_icon School’s Anzac service goes virtual

How one Warwick high school kept their Anzac Day tradition alive despite...

Virtual hearings could be coming to an end

premium_icon Virtual hearings could be coming to an end

Courthouses across the state are assessing the current practice direction.