EARLY LEARNING: Remember the musty smell of school readers that passed through the hands of hundreds?
EARLY LEARNING: Remember the musty smell of school readers that passed through the hands of hundreds? Star Field Stories

What ever happened to Dick and Dora?

SCHOOL bells are set to sound on Monday morning, calling our little ones back to school for the first time in 2018, but what about the good old days of Dick and Dora, Nip and Fluff?

As we help our little ones pack their bags and polish their shoes, some of us might reflect on our own scholarly days.

School readers were a quintessential part of everyone's education back in the day, when you would flip through the pages and drone over drawn out vowel sounds to the frustration of your parent and teachers.

Queensland School Readers are fondly remembered by anyone who went to school in Queensland in the early nineties.

Known to many as 'Red Readers', they were first introduced into schools in 1915 and became the back bone of Queensland's early childhood teaching.

Not only did Readers teach us to decipher the complex English alphabet and perfect our vowels, they also instilled a wealth of knowledge and character in kids of the twentieth century.

'Integrity in word and deed is the backbone of character' while truthfulness and goodness formed the 'essence of character', said the authors of the Readers.

A good temper was encouraged as a 'gift from heaven' while disobedience and boastfulness were shown to have dire consequences.

Oldies will remember content like The Australian flag, Water in a thirsty land, Where the coral lies, Droughts, Some Queensland goldfields, The Great Barrier Reef, Creeks out west, Australia, Chillagoe caves, Aboriginal rock pictures, A bush fire, The ascent of Bellenden Ker, The Australian Alps and Three Australian poets.

Alongside the Queensland Readers, there were other series that gained mass popularity in Queensland schools.

Many of us owe our modern day literacy to titles like Dick and Dora and other Happy Venture readers which were introduced around the 1950, entertaining kids with quirky narratives and vibrant illustrations.



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