Adam Ashley-Cooper of the Waratahs looks dejected after losing the round 15 Super Rugby match between the Waratahs and the Hurricanes at Allianz Stadium on June 2, 2012 in Sydney, Australia.
Adam Ashley-Cooper of the Waratahs looks dejected after losing the round 15 Super Rugby match between the Waratahs and the Hurricanes at Allianz Stadium on June 2, 2012 in Sydney, Australia. Mark Kolbe - Getty Images

What next for Tahs?

ANOTHER Tahs game, and another disaster of the promotional kind for Australian rugby.

If there is one Super team that rugby in Australia needs to be consistently strong, it's the Tahs.

And apart from one or two seasons, they have consistently under-achieved.

Sydney is the toughest sports market in Australia (if not the world). That's a given.

So rugby needs its best promotional vehicle in there, relevant and fighting the good fight.

Seeing a half empty Allianz Stadium is not good for the Tahs or rugby in Australia.

Unfortunately that's not the most disappointing aspect of Tahs rugby during the last decade.

The Simpson Desert-sized disconnect between the Tahs and their fans (expressed so passionately through game-time booing and expressive thoughts in online "suggestion boxes"), is as bad as I've ever witnessed.

What in the world is it that makes a professional rugby club totally disregard its responsibility to win attractively (entertain) and within the current laws and norms of rugby to drop the ball on the foot at every possible opportunity?

This is what generates the majority of the ill-will from fans towards the Tahs.

People pay their hard-earned to get into town and watch the Tahs and then feel totally disrespected by the way the players go about their work.

And it's not just the current coaching group - this has been going on since 2004 and through three coaching regimes: McKenzie; Chris Hickey; and Michael Foley. These three coaches are intelligent and knowledge blokes, so it's very confusing why we find ourselves at this juncture.

Possibly they don't grasp the importance of winning attractive to their own and the Tahs' relevance and survival, or they don't understand the skills, knowledge and propensities of player selection required to deliver winning, attractive rugby. Or maybe there are not players out there to play such a style.

Another issue is the management of the whole shootin' match: the boards of NSW and Tahs rugby. (My understanding is that control of NSW and Tah rugby has been split.) And this is where I believe culpability lies, somewhere in there.

What is needed is the total removal of the risk-adverse culture within the organisations (NSW rugby and Tahs rugby).

Instead of going on about fan forums, action speaks louder than words! Drive the culture that winning or losing attractively is the ultimate goal and the only way forward for the organisations.

Every problem has a solution.

We need the country's most important promotional vehicle firing like a Ferrari, not a spluttering Vespa.

Follow Slatts on Twitter @pjslatts



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