SOUTHERN DOWNS VOTES: What issues will voters take to heart this October election?
SOUTHERN DOWNS VOTES: What issues will voters take to heart this October election?

WHAT YOU WANT: coronavirus to sway Warwick votes

WITH fewer than 100 days until the October Queensland election, voters are getting fired up about the issues that matter most to them.

The Warwick Daily News took to the streets to hear the most pressing concerns of the region’s constituents.

CORONAVIRUS CONTROL

IT IS impossible to look at a state election in 2020 without considering how leaders protected us amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Every resident interviewed approved of the Palaszczuk’s government response to border control and social distancing.

Some such as Peter Miller even believed she should go further.

“I have no sympathy whatsoever,” he said.

“If they gave the bloody sickness to somebody they should be charged with manslaughter.”

Mr Miller said the borders were still functioning for those with business concerns, and applauding the execution of closures.

“I think they’ve had a wonderful idea,” he said.

“I have friend that live over the border and they come backwards and forward for essential business with no issues at all, but those jumping the fence, they should be thrown in jail.”

Eileen Harlow would like to see regional healthcare accessibility improved.
Eileen Harlow would like to see regional healthcare accessibility improved.

BETTER HEALTHCARE

WHILE commending the Palaszczuk government, Warwick resident Eileen Harlow said she wanted to see education and healthcare prioritised by state leaders.

Touting the two as “basic needs”, she wished for more specialised centres in the Rose City.

I think in all your regional areas, you miss out a bit. For example, for severe healthcare needs, we’re forced to go to bigger city centre for things. I have a friend who would like to move here and she’s going to potentially have problems with that aspect,” she said.

‘Toowoomba isn’t that far away, but still a reasonable hike for things at times, especially if you have to access the coaches or something like that.

“If you take education and healthcare away, people don’t have a lot left.”

Ms Harlow said she would be looking to parties’ policies on HECS debts and big business.

Timo Kent would like to see a focus on Granite Belt small business.
Timo Kent would like to see a focus on Granite Belt small business.

BOOST SOUTHERN DOWNS BUSINESS

STANTHORPE farmers Timo and Melanie Kent would like to see state leaders direct their attention to boosting regional business, especially in regards to drought aid.

“I would like to see them putting more money in the Granite Belt and more funding, especially for the farmers,” Mr Kent said.

“We have no water over there, but we get nothing, and when we do get something, it’s a donation of water from charities.”

“It’s getting harder, too,” Mrs Kent added.

The pair also thought more walk less talk was warranted on regional tourism support.

“They’re supposed to be helping bring in more tourists and helping the little business in the Granite Belt, and they need to because farmers don’t have much income and only enough to live on.”

What are you concerns for the Southern Downs this election season? Email us at edit@warwickdailynews.com.au



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