Music streaming app Rdio is great across desktop and mobile platforms.
Music streaming app Rdio is great across desktop and mobile platforms.

Who's still listening to radio when you have your own rdio?

WHEN it comes to variety and the surprise of not knowing what's coming up next, you can't beat listening to your favourite radio station.

Until the ads start, that is.

That's where music streaming apps have really come to the fore.

There are now about a dozen competing for Australian music lovers, with Spotify among the best known.

But there are others that are certainly worth a look - one of the best of them being rdio, a service founded by the creators of Skype.

Rdio has more than 20 million songs in its global catalogue and is well known for providing harder to find songs, as well as all the mainstream hits.

You simply download the app and then start typing in the name of the artist or album and it soon populates with choices.

The interface allows you to browse music while playing the songs you have already started streaming.

It's also designed to be a social experience with you quickly able to see what those in your network are listening to.

Music can be shared to multiple devices (eg a desktop, phone and tablet) and your collections stored for offline use.

Just like iTunes, you can easily create playlists and even share your favourites on Facebook, Twitter or email.

The strength of the app is the ability to People Sidebar which allows you to find others to follow such as artists, critics, record labels and brands.

For ad-free music and prices starting from $8.90 a month, it's a great way to discover new music as well as rediscover favourites from yesteryear.



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