SCRUBBING UP: German medical students Sam Jeske and Julian Zieler looking sharp in their crisp blue scrubs at Warwick Hospital.
SCRUBBING UP: German medical students Sam Jeske and Julian Zieler looking sharp in their crisp blue scrubs at Warwick Hospital. Marian Faa

Why international students are choosing Warwick Hospital

FOREIGN blood has found its way into the emergency room at Warwick Hospital, but doctors have no cause to be alarmed.

Hailing all the way from Munich in Germany, two young medical students chose Warwick as the place to complete their one-month medical internship.

Both in their final year of medical studies, Sam Jeske and Julian Zieler said the training from staff at Warwick rivalled that of any international hospital.

The time, attention and enthusiasm for teaching set Warwick doctors apart, the men said.

"As a student in Germany you really have to fight your way through to practical training against all the other students and interns, especially in the big hospitals,” Mr Jeske said.

"The staff at the Warwick hospital are amazing, all they are all so eager to teach and encourage us to ask questions and participate.”

A tip-off from a friend who also did an internship at the Warwick Hospital prompted the two German students to pursue the overseas opportunity.

Mr Zieler said the hospital offered unique opportunities for learning unavailable in Germany.

"There are so few medical services around here that you get all kinds of cases coming in, where in Germany you have specialists for everything just around the corner,” he said.

"The whole spectrum of problems that come into the hospital here makes it really interesting.”

BOYS IN BLUE: German medical students Sam Jeske and Julian Zieler said the unique hands-on experience they have been getting at Warwick Hospital was invaluable at this stage of their career.
BOYS IN BLUE: German medical students Sam Jeske and Julian Zieler said the unique hands-on experience they have been getting at Warwick Hospital was invaluable at this stage of their career. Marian Faa

Despite the language barriers, getting to know the patients was one of the aspects of the internship the two doctors-in-training loved most.

"It's nice how down-to-earth the patients here are,” Mr Jeske said.

"You can really communicate with them and see the appreciation they have for getting medical care and it makes the job very rewarding.”

Comparing Warwick's hospital to those in Germany, the two noticed a difference in the culture of the rural medical system.

"This is a very non-hierarchical place compared to German hospitals,” Mr Jeske said.

"The communication between doctors and nurses and all other non-physicians is at a level it would not be in Germany.

"People say "hi” to everyone here and even the cleaning staff are well-respected.”

Educational coordinator and doctor Hollie Berghofer said having such keen students was uplifting for the doctors and other hospital staff.

"There is actually a really nice culture of teaching that has developed here over the past three years,” she said.

"The two men have been very inquisitive about many different aspects of life here, not just health but the community and the environment as well.”

In their time off, the bush and wildlife are providing an authentic outback experience for the two Germans.

But with an Aldi right in the centre of town, they can't help feeling like home isn't too far away.



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