Tac and Lyn Campbell look over the body of a wild dog which was shot by Tac after it attacked their flock of sheep in the early hours of Sunday morning. Photo JoJo Newby / The Daily Examiner
Tac and Lyn Campbell look over the body of a wild dog which was shot by Tac after it attacked their flock of sheep in the early hours of Sunday morning. Photo JoJo Newby / The Daily Examiner Jojo Newby

Wild dogs targeted in Queensland with $700,000 funding

THE Queensland Government will hand out over $700,000 to local councils and industry to boost wild dog management programs across the state.

Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry John McVeigh said the government was seeking Expressions of Interest from councils in southern, central and north western Queensland to undertake wild dog control projects in pastoral and peri-urban areas.

Peri-urban refers to areas between a city's outer suburbs and the countryside.

Wild dogs have become a major problem in regional Queensland, leading to the slaughter of livestock and pets.

Some communities have even expressed fears for the safety of children as the dogs become even more daring and move in on residential areas.

"While Biosecurity Queensland provides significant support to combat the wild dog menace, we really need local councils to keep the pressure on wild dogs in these suburban outskirt areas," Mr McVeigh said.

"The government wants to help councils in southern coastal areas with this task and is offering funding of up to $250,000 for projects including mapping, building community skills and control in refuge areas.

Mr McVeigh said the government was also making available $250,000 for councils across south western, central western and north western Queensland to undertake wild dog control projects.

"The key to controlling wild dogs across such vast areas is coordination," he said.

"Ideally, all councils should be using available resources and strategies to ensure a consistent approach. All of our hard work is undone if wild dogs are not controlled in adjoining council areas."

Mr McVeigh said potential projects could involve local mapping and control in areas where wild dog numbers are concentrated and having a significant effect on communities.

"Over the past year, our concerted efforts have started to see some inroads against the wild dog problem but we have to keep up the pressure and find new ways of reducing their numbers and impacts."

Councils seeking further information on the Expression of Interest process should contact the DAFF Customer Service Centre on 13 25 23.

Mr McVeigh said the Newman Government would be contributing $30,000 for a feasibility study into barrier fences in the Blackall-Tambo, Barcaldine and Longreach Regional council areas.



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