BUDDING AUTHOR: Leila Deighton with her new book First Wave.
BUDDING AUTHOR: Leila Deighton with her new book First Wave. Chris Lines

Writer finds her passion after decades of dreams

WARWICK woman Leila Deighton wanted to be a writer the moment she saw her childhood hero Angela Lansbury pattering away at her typewriter in the opening of the '80s sitcom Murder, She Wrote.

Thought it may be a few decades late, she is proving it is never too late to follow your dreams.

"I remember turning on the telly and there she was, Angela Lansbury, with immaculate hair looking beautiful as ever sat at her desk typing away,” Ms Deighton said.

Now at the age of 88, she has published her first book First Wave.

"I can tell you on my first day of writing I was sat in my chair with my hair sticking up, a coffee spilled on the desk, screwed up paper thrown everywhere and still not a single word written.”

First Wave is an autobiographical novel about Ms Deighton's journeys to Papau New Guinea as a Baha'i pioneer.

The Baha'i faith is a religion which aims for unity among all other religions and mankind.

She first learned of it in Darwin 1962, spotting a large poster which had each religion's prophet illuminated by the sun.

"I joined immediately and by 1964 I was off to New Guinea as a pioneer, which is similar to a missionary” she said.

During her cumulative 20 years in the country, Ms Deighton fell in love with the people of New Guinea and her late husband who was New Guinea's first Reuters journalist.

"They wanted him to go cover the Japan Olympics but we did not want to leave, we loved it there,” she said.

Her love for the people of Papua New Guinea was one of the main inspirations for writing First Wave.

Ms Deighton wrote her novel with the encouragement of the Rose City Writers Group.

She encourages people of all ages who are thinking about writing to also join a group.

"Age does not matter when it comes to writing and I am living proof of that,” she said.

"Writing is therapeutic, reflecting over the mistakes and success you have made over a lifetime can be wonderful.”

Grab a copy of First Wave by phoning 46617790.



Men urged to reach out as we're dubbed drought 'epicentre'

premium_icon Men urged to reach out as we're dubbed drought 'epicentre'

Our farmers not as lucky as some who scored pre-winter rain

Support dries up for small-scale wine producers

premium_icon Support dries up for small-scale wine producers

Why you can't find Granite Belt wine in Warwick

Disadvantaged children burst into tears over labour of love

premium_icon Disadvantaged children burst into tears over labour of love

How Warwick Lions are creating safety nets to help turn lives around